SCRS

SCRS To Present Awards At Collision Industry Red Carpet Awards Breakfast During SEMA Show

The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) has announced the first annual Collision Industry Red Carpet Awards Breakfast at the 2017 SEMA Show. This event will be free to attend, and will be held from 7:30-9 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 1 in Ballrooms D-E in the Westgate Las Vegas Resort and Casino.

To RSVP, click here: http://conta.cc/2u4wrEM.

The event will feature some of the most prestigious awards and recognitions from industry organizations, highlighting standout individuals and businesses in the collision repair industry.

As part of the morning ceremony, SCRS will deliver the first-ever March Taylor Kina’ole Award. The Hawaiian word Kina’ole is the embodiment of excellence in the highest form. It is often defined as “Doing the right thing, in the right way, at the right time, in the right place, to the right person, for the right reason, with the right feeling, the first time.”

Many within SCRS and the collision repair industry learned life lessons about Kina’ole from March Taylor, then owner of Auto Body Hawaii in Kailua Kona, Hawaii, and SCRS board member. Ten years ago, on Aug. 26, 2007, Taylor passed away.

“We all lost an invaluable man, friend, mentor and ally that day,” said SCRS Past Chairman Barry Dorn. “March would be the first to tell you that he did nothing ‘significant’ and he was humble beyond belief but he could bridge gaps, change peoples’ minds and move progress forward by simply being who he was. That is the legacy that we all must continue. Individuals like March do not come around often, and it is so important to recognize it when they do, encourage it, and to carry on with what he has started and grow it for future generations.”

Event awards will include:

BodyShop Business Executive of the Year Awards
CIECA Electronic Commerce of the Year Award;

Outstanding Achievement Awards

I-CAR Russ Verona Memorial Award;Jeff Silver Award;

Board of Directors Chairman’s Award

National Auto Body Council Award of Distinction;Body Image Award
Society of Collision Repair Specialists Inaugural presentation of the March Taylor Kina’ole Award

The Collision Industry Red Carpet Awards Breakfast places a priority on encouraging and recognizing greatness in individuals, companies and actions in the collision repair industry in a place where the excitement and energy of the SEMA Show provides the perfect backdrop for such distinguished presentations.

Seating for breakfast will be on a first come, first serve basis, and will be limited to 200 available seats. Organizers request attendees RSVP no later than Sept. 30.

For more information about SCRS, or to join as a member, visit scrs.com, call toll free 1-877-841-0660 or email info@scrs.com.

SCRS Announces Details on OEM Summit Sessions

Prosser, Washington, August 28, 2017 – The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) announces session details outlining the content of the upcoming OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit (Summit) at the 2017 SEMA Show (Show.)

The Summit, held on Thursday, November 2nd, was first launched by SCRS four years ago to put Show attendees in a room with innovators in automotive structural design and technology that can create context around sophisticated advancements in vehicles and emerging technology, and the impact it will have specifically on collision repair businesses.

This year’s three sessions will address the impact that automotive research has on vehicle construction and functionality, the impact that construction and functionality has on performing once-commonplace repair procedures, and the impact that those OEM procedures – or failure to implement them – have on liability and safety.

The sessions will include:

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

OEM1 | N241 | OEM Session I:

How Automotive Research is Driving Change in Vehicle Design, Technology and Function

The automotive industry has proven to be a ripe landscape for revolutionary technology intended to address everything from autonomy and connectivity to structural developments for advanced vehicle light weighting. These technological advancements rely heavily on innovative research for developing and testing complex solutions to be deployed to the motoring public. This research often stems from collaborations between automakers, in the aftermarket, and through educational institutions; all looking to advance safe, efficient and groundbreaking transportation solutions. Moderated by John Waraniak, Vice President Vehicle Technology for SEMA, this distinguished panel will share  insight into the research going on today that has the potential to reshape how you repair vehicles tomorrow.

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

OEM2 | N241 | OEM Session II:

The Impact of Advanced Vehicle Systems on Routine Repair Process and Procedure

New technology is rapidly advancing on vehicles today, and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) are becoming increasingly more popular on new vehicles and can have significant effect on how you perform previously routine services in your collision repair facility. While those on the road benefit from ADAS, the repair industry must change how they approach traditional services as many OEMs require additional procedures, calibrations and tools to ensure restoration of vehicle functionality. Kaleb Silver, Senior Product Manager for Hunter Engineering will present on challenges facing the industry, and the impact of advanced systems on routine services such as wheel alignments. After the presentation he will welcome the following panel to discuss the growing complexities facing the repair marketplaces.

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

OEM3 | N241 | OEM Session III:

The Hidden Dangers of Vehicle Technology, Improper Repair Methodology and Your Liabilities

Those operating within the collision repair industry find themselves in tumultuous times. While the functional and structural technologies in modern-day vehicles are evolving at a breakneck pace (and expected to evolve even faster on our way to autonomous vehicles), the collision repair industry faces a growing gap in skilled workers, and continual downward pressure to mitigate repair expenses and operations performed. In an industry culture that seemingly rewards those who charge the least, rather than those who perform the best, it is an increasing challenge for businesses committed to repairs that are fully compliant with OEM methodologies. In 2017 the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) reaffirmed its longstanding position that “if an OEM documents a repair procedure as required, recommended or otherwise necessary as a result of damage or repair, that those published procedures would be the standard of repair until such time the documentation changes. Disregarding a documented procedure that is made available to the industry creates undue and avoidable liability on the repair facility performing the repair.”

This panel, moderated by John Ellis, Managing Director of Ellis & Associates, will address an industry grappling to reconcile how to move forward for the consumer when certain automotive manufacturer requirements are expected to be performed on every occasion, but insurance claims positioning leans towards “case-by-case” approval. The participants will feature litigators, technology experts, and those with experience in facing liability and safety implications with performing repairs in today’s environment. As current litigation exposes flaws in the rationale for deviating from OEM repair procedures, there isn’t a more critical discussion to participate in for today’s collision repair operator.

Panelists will be announced in a forthcoming release, but registration for these sessions is open. Space will be limited and early registration is encouraged.

Sessions can be selected individually at www.scrs.com/rde or as part of the RDE Full Series Pass.

The 2017 OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit is made possible with support from PPG Automotive Refinish; AkzoNobel; BASF; CCC Information Services, Inc.; DeBeer Refinish; Reliable Automotive Equipment, Inc.; Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A.; and SEMA.

For more information about SCRS, or to join as a member, please visit www.scrs.com, call toll free 1-877-841-0660 or email us at info@scrs.com.

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About SCRS: 

Through its direct members and 39 affiliate associations, SCRS is comprised of 6,000 collision repair businesses and 58,500 specialized professionals who work with consumers and insurance companies to repair collision-damaged vehicles. Additional information about SCRS including other news releases is available at the SCRS website: www.scrs.com. You can e-mail SCRS at the following address: info@scrs.com.

SEMA Event: Talking Shop with Chip Foose

The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) and Capital One® Spark Business® will be hosting a special event from 3:00 – 5:00pm, on Tuesday, November 1st at the 2016 SEMA Show.  This exclusive event will be a conversation titled “A Business Fueled by Passion – Talking Shop with Chip Foose,” and will be held in the North Hall, Upper Level, Room N258.

During the session, legendary automotive designer and entrepreneur Chip Foose will talk about growing a business, finding and leveraging resources to drive success, and lessons he learned along the way. Chip will be joined onstage by Buck Stinson, head of Small Business Credit Card at Capital One. The event will be limited to 300 participants.

To attend this exclusive event and interact first hand with Chip Foose, here is what you need to do:

  1. Click here to register yourself to pre-qualify for a ticket.
  2. Be one of the first 150 people on the pre-qualification list to show up to the SCRS booth at the SEMA Show (North Hall, Booth #11173) between 9:00am and 2:00pm on opening day, Tuesday, November 1st.

There is no charge to attend this event; however, it will be limited to 300 participants. Tickets will be provided on a first-come, first served basis, and are limited to one per individual. We do anticipate that this event will reach maximum capacity, so we encourage you to come to the booth early in the day Tuesday to collect your pass. For those who do not receive a VIP pass, the panel will be live-streamed via Periscope – follow @CapitalOne on Periscope to learn from Chip first-hand about creative ways to maximize business potential and to accelerate growth.

Capital One® Spark Business® is a corporate member of SCRS and a top-level sponsor of the 2016 Repairer Driven Education (RDE) series at the SEMA Show.

About Spark Business:

Capital One® offers a broad spectrum of financial products and services to consumers, small businesses, and commercial clients. Spark Business from Capital One comprises a suite of innovative products and services specifically designed for small business, including credit cards with unlimited rewards, no-fee checking and savings, and secure and flexible merchant service offerings. Spark Business provides tips, resources, and inspiration to help your business thrive at www.SparkBusinessIQ.com. For more information, visit www.CapitalOne.com/smallbusiness.

About SCRS:

Through its direct members and 40 affiliate associations, SCRS is comprised of 6,000 collision repair businesses and 58,500 specialized professionals who work with consumers and insurance companies to repair collision-damaged vehicles. Additional information about SCRS including other news releases is available at the SCRS website: www.scrs.com. You can e-mail SCRS at the following address: info@scrs.com.

About SCRS’ RDE Series:

REPAIRER DRIVEN EDUCATION (RDE) series will feature 4 days of seminar offerings, many of which are uniquely designed and being offered only at the 2016 SEMA Show, including the OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit. Each session has been individually selected or crafted by SCRS because the content focus on information that is relevant to the diverse array of marketplace perspectives within the collision repair industry. Better your business, and register at www.semashow.com/scrs.

Not all of the aluminums used by different automakers are the same

Note from Aaron Schulenburg, Executive Director, Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS)

“I asked John Yoswick if I could share this with you all because I think there is a really important fact that was captured here. It is one of the best documented facts of why just because one automaker approves of a tool, or an operation, does not mean it is equally applicable to another automaker. This is a great statement that I hope all of the industry sees and understands.”

KEY DIFFERENCES IN ALUMINUMS: During the Society of Collision Repair Specialists’ “OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit” last month(CRASH 11/30/15), Doug Richman of Kaiser Aluminum cautioned that not all of the aluminums used by different automakers are the same, and they will act differently during repairs. “The bad news is there’s no way folks in your business can tell which version of aluminum you’re looking at,” he said. “There’s no visual distinguishing characteristics you can [use to] determine what the alloy is and what the temper is. But the variations will have a different impact in how you approach the repair. The solution is: We all need to be sure we’re paying attention to the OEM guidelines for the repair of a specific model. They know for each part what the alloy was, what the temper was and how it needs to be handled.” He said most of the aluminums being used are a “T4” temper, for example, which is lower-strength and thus can be formed into complex shapes in the manufacturing process. But some manufacturers, primarily European automakers of higher-end vehicles, then put vehicles through an age (or bake) cycle that raises the aluminum to a “T6” temper which is at least 50 percent stronger than “T4.” This allows them to maximize weight reductions by using even thinner grades of aluminum than, say, that used on the F-150, while still being strong and damage-resistant. Heat from welding can significantly reduce the tensile strength of aluminum, which is why some automakers require the use of specific welders and why OEM procedures often call for use of a backing plate when joining to restore the full strength of that area of the vehicle.

This article is being distributed with permission of CRASH Network. To become a CRASH Network subscriber, visit www.crashnetwork.com.

SCRS Announces Featured Experts for OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit

Prosser, Washington, October 20, 2015 – The OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit is one of the most unique networking and learning opportunities available to the collision repair industry, designed to put SEMA Show attendees in a room with innovators in automotive structural design and technology. The Summit’s focus is on emerging trends in vehicle construction and technology, and how both of those aspects influence vehicle repairability and collision industry preparation.
The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) has compiled a slate of the industry’s most respected subject matter experts who bring rich histories of involvement in the sophisticated advancements seen in the automotive and collision repair fields. The presenters, moderators and panelists will highlight architectural and technological developments in modern vehicles, and how those advancements intersect with the repair process. Every participant in this industry can benefit from better insight into how vehicles and materials are evolving, what that means in the repair process and what will be expected of those who are performing these repairs.

The day will be broken into three segments, and attendees can register for all three as a complete series, or for each independently. All three segments of the OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit are included in the RDE Full Series Pass.

Onsite registrations can be secured in the main Show registration area, or outside the session rooms.

The OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit will be held between 9:30am – 5:00pm on Thursday, November 5th, 2015 in room N241 found on the upper level of the North Hall in the Las Vegas Convention Center. The upper level can be accessed by the escalator next to the food court in the North Hall Lobby.

OEM1 | Advanced Automotive Technology:

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Structural Connectivity – Understanding the Future of Automaker Joining Techniques

Featuring:

Steve Marks | Industry Technical Support Manager, I-CAR (Moderator)

Doug Craig | Technical Application Engineer, LORD Corporation

Klaus Reitzig | Chief Engineer and Director, Wielander + Schill Engineering

Oliver Woelfel | President, Advanced Collision Repair Solutions

Shawn Collins | Senior Technical Service Engineer, 3M

A panel of specialists with backgrounds in automotive joining will discuss the advanced structural joining approaches being used in modern automotive architecture. The panelists will have expertise in riveting, bonding and welding of aluminum, steel and mixed materials.

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Tech Crunch -The Role of Programming and Diagnostics in Post-Repair Road Worthiness

Featuring:

Aaron Clark | Vice President of Technical Compliance, Assured Performance Network (Moderator)

Chuck Olsen |Director of Diagnostics and Technical Support, Collision Diagnostic Services

Eric Mendoza | Collision Repair & Refinish Training Assistant Manager, Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc.

John Ellis | Managing Director, Ellis & Associates

John Waraniak | Vice President Vehicle Technology, Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA)

A panel of automakers and technology specialists discuss the real world application of vehicle scans, diagnostics and calibrations. These subject matter experts will bring a focus on technical aspects of vehicle scan code requirements and the role that diagnostic testing plays in repairing vehicles and restoring roadworthiness.

12:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

OEM2 | The Future of Aluminum in the Automotive Industry

Presented by:

Doug Richman | Vice President of Engineering and Technology, Kaiser Aluminum

Also featuring:

Brandin Benson | Service Engineer, Product Technical Support, Mercedes-Benz USA

Mark Allen | Specialist, Collision Programs & Workshop Equipment, Audi of America

Mark Szlachta | Advanced Service of Design Engineer, GM

A fascinating presentation on technological advancements in aluminum manufacturing, construction and engineering, joining and other advancements that are predicted to impact how frequently aluminum will be present in your repair facility, and how it will be used on automotive bodies. The presentation will include perspectives on how light weighting is driving innovation, and the role repairability plays in aluminum development.

Following the presentation, a panel of automakers will join the presenter on stage to further discuss the real world application of aluminum structures in vehicle design, vehicle safety and vehicle repairability.

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

OEM3 | The Continuing Evolution of Advanced Steels in Automotive Bodies 

Presented by:

Dr. Blake Zuidema | Director of Automotive Product Applications, ArcelorMittal

Also featuring:

Chris Tobie | Instructional Designer, American Honda Motor Co.

Joe DiDonato | Technical Training Administrator, Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc.

John Hughes | Collision Repair Responsible, FCA

Robert Hartman | Team Leader – North American Structures & Closures, GM

Automotive light weighting and looming governmental expectations relative to emissions standards are driving major changes and innovations in the steel industry. Aluminum may have been all the rage in collision industry information, but steel continues to be poised to play the most significant role in the automotive footprint for the foreseeable future; although, not necessarily the same steel that that the industry is accustomed to. This program will elaborate on technological advancements in steel manufacturing that have driven changed in automotive structural designs, and to make parts that meet the expectations of safer, lighter and more advanced automobiles.

Following the presentation, a panel of automakers will join onstage to further discuss the real world application of steel structures in vehicle design, vehicle safety and vehicle repairability.

You can register for the OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit and other RDE sessions at www.scrs.com/rde.

About SEMA and the SEMA Show: The SEMA Show is a trade show produced by the Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA), a nonprofit trade association founded in 1963. Since the first SEMA Show debuted in 1967, the annual event has served as the leading venue bringing together manufacturers and buyers within the automotive specialty equipment industry. Products featured at the SEMA Show include those that enhance the styling, functionality, comfort, convenience and safety of cars and trucks. Additional details available at www.semashow.com or www.sema.org, (909) 396-0289.

About SCRS’ RDE Series: REPAIRER DRIVEN EDUCATION (RDE) series will feature 4 days of seminar offerings, many of which are uniquely designed and being offered only at the 2015 SEMA Show. Each of the courses has been individually selected or crafted by SCRS because the content specifically focuses on information that is relevant to the diverse array of marketplace perspectives within the collision repair industry. More information is available at www.semashow.com/scrs.

About SCRS: Through its direct members and 45 affiliate associations, SCRS is comprised of 6,000 collision repair businesses and 58,500 specialized professionals who work with consumers and insurance companies to repair collision-damaged vehicles. Additional information about SCRS including other news releases is available at the SCRS website: www.scrs.com. You can e-mail SCRS at the following address: info@scrs.com.

Registration for RDE at SEMA is Open

From CollisionWeek News

Registration for the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) education programs at the SEMA Show is open. The 2015 Repairer Driven Education (RDE) series and OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit will feature more than 30 educational sessions delivered November 3-6 during show hours. Each session has been individually selected or suggested by SCRS for content that specifically focuses on issues and information of relevance to collision repair professionals operating in today’s marketplace.

Registering early not only ensures that you have your week planned out and a spot reserved in all education classes, but it can save you money on both the pass into the show as well as the cost of the educational programs. Badges for approved on-line registration begin mailing in this month.

The education sessions can be selected individually, or accessed with a $375 Full Series Pass which includes admission to one regular RDE session in each available time slot, access to all three segments of the OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit, and admission for one to the SCRS Sky Villa After-party on Thursday night in the Westgate Las Vegas Resort & Casino.

More information is available online.

SCRS Addresses IP Auto Renewal Clauses

Prosser, Washington, April 24, 2015 – During the association’s open board meeting in Atlanta, Georgia, the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) announced communication efforts on behalf of the industry to address automatic renewal terms with information service providers (IPs) AudaExplore, CCC and Mitchell.  SCRS had fielded concerns from different members in varying areas of the country who were involved in complications surrounding the automatic renewals of their contracts. As a result of these conversations, SCRS posed the following questions to the IPs:

The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) has received communication from our membership surrounding some of the standard terms and conditions found within your company’s license agreement. Specifically, there has been concern expressed surrounding the “evergreen” clause found in the terms of the agreement which commits the end-user to a perpetually renewing contract, unless the end-user provides written notice ninety (90) days prior to the conclusion of the existing term.

SCRS, and your customers who have expressed concerns over the term condition, both understand the value of auto-renewal terms and commitments, and have no objection to the ongoing use of auto-renewal language. However, transparency between end-users and their service providers is important to our membership and we believe, to your full customer base.

We are writing to better understand the reasoning behind your existing contract renewal process, and to inquire whether your company would consider adoption of a more proactive notification system prior to auto-renewal.

 With terms often extending for lengthy periods of time, many business owners do not have recollection of the exact date that the current term expires, or the date by which they have a duty to opt-out of the renewal if they so desire. It is our believe that your company would provide a great service to the industry by providing a written notification prior to the deadline for notification, reminding clients that their current contract term is ending, and that their subscription will be automatically renewed unless they provide written response within a defined period of time.

 This notification would seemingly protect your interest in a newly renewed contract term, and would provide the end-users the opportunity to responsibly manage their account. We understand that contracts between the service provider and the user are individual business agreements, but we hope that your company sees equal value in providing transparency in the transition between contract renewals. If there are reasons you are unable to adopt a more transparent notification process, we ask that you justify that reasoning so that we can pass that on to our membership.

As a result of the inquiry, AudaExplore provided a return letter advising that “beginning June 1st, 2015, all new contracts for repairers will continue to have an evergreen clause,” but “subsequent renewal terms will only be for one year, regardless of the initial term length.” The company also committed to apply this policy retroactively to existing client contracts on a case-by-case basis, and to research a potential future solution to facilitate an automated notification of an upcoming renewal. Click here to see the full response from AudaExplore.

CCC’s written response highlighted the benefits of the auto-renew feature, and pointed out existing language within their standard master license agreement where “there is a provision that provides [their] customers an opportunity to communicate their intent to not renew the agreement.” It was their position that “this provision provides an appropriate mechanism for both parties to manage the contract renewal process.” Click here to see the full response from CCC.

Mitchell responded via email concluding that while “there is no contracting process that will delight every customer, we believe our current approach to auto-renew at like term serves the needs of our broad and diverse customer base well with the smallest amount of service disruption possible.” Further email communications to elaborate on their current process resulted in a response stating “all of [Mitchell’s] contracts have an auto-renew clause. That clause does allow the shop to cancel with notification at their renewal date. [Mitchell’s] current process does not include a renewal notification.” Click here to see the full response from Mitchell.

“Part of SCRS’ purpose is to advocate for better business conditions on behalf of our membership,” shared SCRS Chairman Andy Dingman. “When there are broad sweeping policies in place that could be adjusted to better serve our industry, we see value in identifying and seeking improvement. We are pleased that with at least two of the three IPs the communication resulted in either an improvement in the renewal approach or clarification that options exist for the consumer to avoid auto-renewal altogether, should they desire.”

The SCRS Board of Directors continues to desire a solution from all three entities that would provide more automated notifications to prompt end-users prior to contract periods renewing, when the automatic renewal is in place.

“As software and technology companies, programming a notification solution for this industry need seems like it should present an opportunity for these companies to shine,” concluded Dingman.

SCRS continues to urge collision repair businesses to pay close attention to terms and commitments of all contracts prior to entering into any agreement.

If your business is interested in joining the largest national trade association dedicated to representing the collision repair professional, please contact our offices at info@scrs.com. For more information about SCRS, visit our website at www.scrs.com.

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About SCRS: Through its direct members and 46 affiliate associations, SCRS is comprised of 6,000 collision repair businesses and 58,500 specialized professionals who work with consumers and insurance companies to repair collision-damaged vehicles. Additional information about SCRS including other news releases is available at the SCRS website: www.scrs.com. You can e-mail SCRS at the following address: info@scrs.com.

SCRS honors recent, lifetime efforts for collision repair industry

Former Society of Collision Repair Specialists Chairman Barry Dorn, left, poses with SCRS Lifetime Member Gene Hamilton and Hamilton's daughter, Michelle Coombs on Wednesday at a luncheon ahead of the Collision Industry Conference in Atlanta. (John Huetter/Repairer Driven News)

The Society of Collision Repair Specialists on Wednesday honored two recent acts and three lifetimes of service to collision repair — including giving out only the fourth lifetime membership in its history.

Sports & Imports Collision owner Gene Hamilton, who had already won the SCRS industry and lifetime achievement awards, completed the Triple Crown with the Lifetime Honorary Membership.

Former SCRS Chairman Barry Dorn — recognized as well Wednesday– observed that only three lifetime membership had been given out in the past by the more than 30-year-old organization.

Sports & Imports general manager Michelle Coombs, speaking on behalf of her father, said he would probably tell the audience that the industry has given him more than he’s given it.

Dorn won the National Lifetime Achievement Award, and SCRS Executive Director Aaron Schulenburg said the honor showed that one person could make a difference. Schulenburg also noted that Dorn served as a contributing creator to some of the most beneficial and meaningful resources to the industry including the database task force, the Database Enhancement Gateway (DEG), SCRS’ Guide to Complete Repair Planning, The Repairer Driven Education series at the SEMA show and this very news source, Repairer Driven News.

The recognition was one of the highlights of his life, Dorn said.

“I sincerely appreciate it,” he said.

Dorn said Friday he was caught off guard by the announcement — and he’s even on the awards committee.

“I wanted to thank all of my mentors over the years that have helped me become who I am and guide me down a path that I couldn’t venture down without their help,” he said in a statement Friday. “”People like Lou Dilisio, Jeff Hendler, March Taylor, Toby Chess and Gary Wano. Men who helped me understand that I can’t do what I do for SCRS for my own personal gain but I do what do for the betterment of the industry and at the will of our membership.

“My wife Jordan and my kids to deal with my frequent travel and hectic schedule along with the numerous phone calls at night and during weekends. My co-workers at Dorn’s who make it possible for me to be gone and do what I do to help the industry. My mother, who I lost last year. She forged me into who I am. She taught me to stand up for what was right, work hard at whatever I do, to be honorable, humble and to never give up.

“Lastly, I want to thank Aaron Schulenburg and the boards both present and past. All of you make it possible for me to learn what I do, each day. I am truly blessed to know and work with all of you and I can’t thank you enough for all that you do for this industry. All of you are like my brothers and special to me in many ways.”

Former Society of Collision Repair Specialists Chairman Barry Dorn received the SCRS National Lifetime Achievement Award on Wednesday. (John Huetter/Repairer Driven News)

Bob Jones took the Regional Lifetime Achievement Award, and he thanked his brother who kept the shop running while he was out working for the collision repair industry.

“I’ll cherish this industry forever,” Jones said. “… I love this industry. It’s been my life.”

Georgia Collision Industry Association Executive Director Howard Batchelor received the Collision Achievement Award for his detailed research into paint and materials taxes — and double taxation — across the country.

The Nonindividual Award went to I-CAR for the Repairability Technical Support portal launched last year.

The awards were presented ahead of the Collision Industry Conference in Atlanta, Ga. — Hamilton and Batchelor’s home state.

Featured image: Former Society of Collision Repair Specialists Chairman Barry Dorn, left, poses with SCRS Lifetime Member Gene Hamilton and Hamilton’s daughter, Michelle Coombs on Wednesday at a luncheon ahead of the Collision Industry Conference in Atlanta. (John Huetter/Repairer Driven News)

Atlanta, GA to Host SCRS Week Events in April

Prosser, Washington, March 5, 2015 – On Tuesday, April 7th, the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) will hold an Open Board Meeting from 3:00 – 5:00pm at the Crown Plaza Ravina (hotel reservations phone 877-270-1393) in Atlanta, Georgia. Everyone wishing to learn more about the association’s industry work is encouraged to attend. The two hour meeting will include updates from SCRS staff, committees, and guests from our local Affiliate Associations outlining current and future work initiatives each group has undertaken on behalf of the membership.

The open meeting will be immediately followed by SCRS’ annual election for open seats on the board of directors, promptly beginning at 5:15pm. The election is open to current designated voting representatives of SCRS member businesses. Members must be present to vote. To join as a member of SCRS to participate in the upcoming election, contact the association office at info@scrs.com. The election will fill four (4) open board seats, and candidates running for the seats will be announced shortly.

On Wednesday, SCRS will be hosting a Repairer Roundtable meeting from 8:30am – 11:00am focused on safety and preventative measures collision repairers should be taking as the vehicles and materials found in the repair process evolve. The morning will feature a panel and live audience discussion. SCRS has opened up this event to invite anyone in the industry that wishes to learn from and support initiatives that foster a better informed industry.

At 11:15am on Wednesday, just prior to the start of the Collision Industry Conference (CIC), SCRS will host the annual Corporate Member & Industry Awards recognition lunch. Members of the industry are welcomed and encouraged to attend this great event designed to recognize great work taking place in the industry. RSVP is absolutely required.

There is no fee to attend any of the events, but SCRS does request you please RSVP for one or both, Repairer Roundtable and the Awards Luncheon (click on  title for RSVP access or email info@scrs.com). Please register no later than Friday, April 3rd, 2015.

SCRS events daily schedule:

Tuesday, April 7th

3:00 – 5:00pm      SCRS Open Meeting

5:15 – 5:30pm      SCRS Annual Election

Wednesday, April 8th

8:30 – 11:00am    Repairer Roundtable*

11:15 – 12:45pm  SCRS Corporate Member & Industry Awards Lunch*

*RSVP now to for each event as specified or email info@scrs.com.
For more information about SCRS, or to join as a member, please visit www.scrs.com, call toll free 1-877-841-0660 or email us at info@scrs.com.

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About SCRS: Through its direct members and 45 affiliate associations, SCRS is comprised of 6,000 collision repair businesses and 58,500 specialized professionals who work with consumers and insurance companies to repair collision-damaged vehicles. Additional information about SCRS including other news releases is available at the SCRS website: www.scrs.com. You can e-mail SCRS at the following address: info@scrs.com.

SCRS Admin Office

877.841.0660

877.851.0660 Fax

info@scrs.com

Aaron Schulenburg

Executive Director | Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS)

302.423.3537

877.435.6028 Fax

aaron@scrs.com

Inside the Aluminum Revolution: Factors to Consider When Upgrading

Not since the introduction of the unibody vehicle has there been as revolutionary a topic to hit the collision repair industry as aluminum repair. With more and more cars and trucks equipped with this innovative material – as well as tools, products and equipment specifically designed for them – entering the market every day, the debate on how and with what to best perform proper aluminum repairs rages on. The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) recently sat down with representatives from the equipment and tooling sides of the industry, as well as several collision repair facilities who have taken the plunge of upgrading, to get their perspectives on repair safety, the importance of accurate information and their personal experiences on the front lines of the aluminum revolution.

As someone who has seen his share of tools, fasteners and repair solutions, Bastian Hartmann, project manager of Advanced Joining Technologies for Indiana-based Bollhoff, Inc., a self-piercing rivet (SPR) fastener and tooling company, is well aware of the importance of a good tool – and the devastating consequences of an inferior one. “A company who wants to provide a proper SPR repair kit should not only sell a tool, but also have the experience and competence to guide their customers on how to set an SPR properly based on the application or material combination,” he says. “SPR equipment in mass production runs with high setting forces of up to 80kN (approximately 1.5 seconds per joint), and full process monitoring on parts fixed and clamped in engineered devices. To match the same joint quality with a handheld tool in a workshop requires not only different parameters, but also training on the technology itself. Training should be provided to all operators in the correct use of the tooling and appropriate personal safety equipment should be worn at all times.”

“Rivets can take up to 11,000 pounds of force on an 8-millimeter tip,” notes Dave Gruskos, president of Reliable Automotive Equipment (RAE). “Tip quality and arm stability is vital to performing a safe and proper repair. Also, the types of rivets vary from one OEM to another, so one needs the ability to adapt the rivet to fit each job. A battery-powered rivet gun for a tiny rivet, for example, may not be the best direction.”

So how can repairers be sure they’re using the right tools for the job, and more importantly, stay safe while working with them? “Collision repair professionals should be purchasing tools that have been approved and tested by car manufacturers,” enforces Gruskos. “There should be training provided on the tools’ proper use by suppliers that have a tech line. But it doesn’t stop there; repairers should continue to be trained – and retrained – yearly, and should also have tools certified on an annual basis as well.”

“For the installation of the SPR, body shop operators should follow the tool’s operation manual and OEM guidelines, including all safety procedures,” adds Hartmann. “For the application, in the best case, there is an OEM repair guideline existing which describes the exact setting parameters and the rivet/die combination to use at a certain location. This takes away the ‘guessing’ on the operator side and keeps both body shop and customer safe. If such a document is not available, the OEM should provide a general SPR guideline and the provider for the equipment should be able to help the operator achieve the joint quality described in the document.”

There is a plethora of information to consider when researching the decision to upgrade or modify tooling and equipment in the shop. However, in many cases, some of the most valuable data can often come straight from the real life experiences of those who have experienced it firsthand. SCRS Past Chairman Gary Wano of G.W. and Son Auto Body, Inc. in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma is a facility owner who has adopted advanced equipment and tooling to prepare for the future. As he advises, the decision cannot be made overnight. “The adoption of advanced programs, tooling, equipment and procedures has to be birthed from leadership, but a continual culture of learning must also be embraced, from the very top to the very bottom of the shop,” he says. “This is not just a plaque on a wall; it’s about making sure the correct processes are in place, about continually investing in the improvement of your business and about making sure that the people you have along for the journey are as dedicated to the business’ success as you are.”

Once a shop has committed to upgrading, SCRS board member Kye Yeung of European Motor Car Works, Santa Ana, California, notes that the research process into tool and equipment purchases should encompass the past, present and future. “As a shop owner, [deciding on equipment for advanced materials], I would look back at which lines I repaired, who my customers were, and whether those OEs were thinking about changing their production or technology in the near future, i.e. carbon fiber. You don’t want to circumvent a process where a manufacturer comes up with something unique, leaving you with outdated equipment. If you’re going through that push to upgrade, start slowly; get all the basics out of the way before deciding exactly what large purchases to buy.”

As Yeung continues, those large purchases should be considered with universality and convenience in mind whenever possible. “Like any type of purchase, the so-called ‘right’ brand would in my eyes have to include a service network that’s easily attainable. Our shop was originally involved with the Aston Martin factory approved program, and every piece of equipment had to be imported. Even their adhesives were Euro-specific; you simply could not get them in the States. The accessibility of service is huge. And my suggestion would be, before you jump, see what required equipment can be used on multiple lines.”

“The manufacturers dictate the tools, the equipment and the training that are mandatory [for the repair of advanced materials],” adds SCRS Chairman Ron Reichen, Precision Body & Paint, with multiple locations in Oregon. “If you’re going to take that plunge and invest in becoming a certified shop, you need to make that decision to either dip your toe in the water, or to jump in and become certified for several lines. If you invest in building a clean room for Audi’s certification program, for example, you’ll be able to use that space for several lines. Some pieces of equipment also have crossover, and with an average cost of $10,000 apiece or more on rivet guns and between $20,000 to $30,000 on welders, the economies of scale really do come into play in some respects. Do your due diligence, do your homework and pay attention to the big picture.”

While market demand is also hugely influential to the decision-making process, Reichen stresses, “Research whether your market will support the lines you want to work on before purchasing equipment to fix them. Outside of your relationship with the OE, the most important tool in a repairer’s arsenal can be one’s own peers. Wano agrees, “My relationships with my industry colleagues have been extremely helpful in my research. Whether it’s calling around to get their experiences on a certain piece of equipment or getting their take on a particular tool, keeping the lines of communication open helps us all make more informed, realistic decisions for our customers.” Yeung adds, “Your relationship with the OE and sponsoring dealer is very important because if you don’t have that affiliation, you might not know where to start in terms of purchasing equipment or getting training. Industry groups and communication are incredibly important to help facilitate that.”

“The SCRS’ OEM Collision Repair Technology Summit held during the SEMA Show allowed us to hear from the aluminum and steel industry, as well as multiple automakers and businesses who have gone through the certification process,” Reichen says. “Events like these offer tons of information in one place, and grant access to more pieces of the puzzle, which is crucial for repairers who may not know where to start otherwise.”

Regardless of where you as a repairer are in the process of determining your shop’s future upgrades, one thing is for certain: The OEMs – and industry associations like SCRS – are the greatest source of information on the ins and outs of becoming (and staying) certified, choosing the proper equipment for your business and fostering continued success in the market.

For more information about SCRS, or to join as a member, please visit www.scrs.com, call toll free 1-877-841-0660 or email us at info@scrs.com.

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About SCRS: Through its direct members and 45 affiliate associations, SCRS is comprised of 6,000 collision repair businesses and 58,500 specialized professionals who work with consumers and insurance companies to repair collision-damaged vehicles. Additional information about SCRS including other news releases is available at the SCRS website: www.scrs.com. You can e-mail SCRS at the following address: info@scrs.com.