Collision Management Systems

OEM Collision Position Statements Added to OEM1Stop.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Chris Caris
313-203-7252
ccaris@campbellmarketing.com

OEM Collision Position Statements Added to OEM1Stop.com

Major refresh of the popular website gives repairers easier access to key automaker position statements and other important repair information

Dearborn, Mich. – August 11, 2016 – The popular OEM repair information website OEM1Stop.com has been improved and relaunched, now including for the first time automaker position statements on important collision repair issues.

The site, which is operated by a coalition of automakers known as the OEM Collision Repair Roundtable, Inc., was introduced in 2008 in response to collision industry calls for easier access to important OEM collision repair information. Since then, the site has provided repairers a “one-stop” source for that information by offering direct links to the collision and mechanical repair websites of close to 40 automaker brands; and it’s been a hit with the industry, with just under 80,000 visits in 2015, an increase of 70 percent since 2010.

Over the last few years, however, as vehicles—and the materials and technologies used to make them—have become more complex, automakers have released a great deal of additional collision repair information, such as position statements on key repair questions. Repair technicians set on following OEM repair recommendations and procedures, along with the industry associations representing them, have continued to seek out and utilize the new information to help make proper repairs the first time, but it had once again become difficult to find at times.

OEM Roundtable members are hoping the new OEM1Stop.com will help resolve that problem. The site now features a page dedicated specifically to OEM position statements, with common parts- and repair procedure-related topics called out—such as structural parts, salvage airbags, clip repairs, wheel reconditioning and vehicle repair scanning—and each OEM statement in that category listed for easy access.

In addition, most of the OEMs now have their own dedicated page on the site as well, allowing each a place to list their collision repair positions and offer other important repair-related materials. Ford, for instance, in addition to its position statements, has included its F-150 repair instruction sheets, and current and back issues of its On Target collision repair newsletter.

“OEM1Stop has proven to be a tremendous resource for repairers seeking the latest OEM collision and mechanical repair information, but the addition of automaker position statements is something the industry has asked for, and we think it’s an important enhancement that will make the site that much more valuable for shops intent on fixing collision-damaged vehicles right the first time,” said Gary Ledoux, assistant national manager of wholesale parts marketing at American Honda and current chairman of the OEM Roundtable.

New OEM positions and other information will be added to the site as they are made
available, so repairers are urged to check back often. Meanwhile, the OEM Roundtable’s other website—CrashRepairInfo.com—continues to be an easy-to-use resource shops can make available to their customers, offering collision repair basics and other information intended to help guide them through the often challenging and frustrating collision repair process.

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About OEM Collision Repair Roundtable, Inc.
Formed in 1998, OEM Collision Repair Roundtable, Inc., is a non-profit collision repair industry
association composed of representatives from original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicle
manufacturers. Member companies include Audi of America, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles US LLC, Ford
Motor Company, General Motors, American Honda Motor Co., Hyundai Motor America, Mazda North
American Operations, Nissan North America, Subaru of America, Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A.,
Volkswagen of America, Volvo Car USA, LLC and the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers.

Registration Now Open for I-CAR’s Level 2 Production Management Curriculum

I-CAR announced 10 new courses that form the second level of its production management curriculum for collision repair facility personnel. Individuals can learn more about the course and register for production management courses online or by calling I-CAR Customer Care at (800) ICAR USA.

I-CARAll the new production management courses, as well as those launched in 2015, have now been configured to allow for more flexible access supporting customized learning paths. Training paths can now be tailored to the role-specific knowledge needs of collision repair professionals involved in shop-wide production processes, as well as for those responsible only for sub-elements

Job Costing Management Seminar August 16th

JOB COSTING, MANAGING NUMBERS AND PREPARING DETAILED REPAIR BLUEPRINTS, NEED HELP?

Plan to attend this 1 day workshop/seminar for assistance in tackling these issues.
SATURDAY AUGUST 16, 2014 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM
JEFFERSON STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE – HOOVER, AL
4600 VALLEYDALE ROAD
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 35242
205-983-5911/800-239-5900
http://www.jeffstateonline.com/locations/shelby/

RON PERRETTA – GLOBAL BUSINESS COACHING
Ron is President and owner of Professionals Auto Body Inc with two locations along with a full mechanical facility in Central Pennsylvania (www.ProfessionalsAutoBody.com). Ron has provided business management training as a collision repair industry consultant since 1995.

Working together to get Ron to Birmingham to present this workshop/seminar is a joint effort of groups working together to move the collision repair industry forward through education and awareness.

Sponsors of this event are:

Rozar’s Paint Supply and PPG
Overnight Parts Alliance
Edwards Chevrolet
National Coatings Supply
Alabama Automotive Repair Industry Society of Excellence

Register today (only 100 seats available). $25.00 per person registration includes lunch and refreshments for the day. Download info sheet and registration form in PDF – Click here.

SCRS Examines Repairer Ability to Control Data Flow

Article details ways repairers may be able to manage how “data pumps” access file information

Many repairers are unaware of the breadth of data being extracted from their servers, where it is being extracted from, what settings they could employ to better control the flow of information, or even how that information may be used beyond its intended purpose. For years, the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) has alerted its members about the potential risk and liability associated with inadequate control over estimate data and business information.

As one recent example, SCRS was notified of growing concerns relative to the collection of data through participation in the PartsTrader parts procurement program. As the program rolled out across the nation, more questions began to arise when end-users noticed key identifying information from non-State Farm estimate files populating their PartsTrader dashboard. The repairer concern surrounds the amount of non-voluntary information being provided through the data collection process which could offer valuable information surrounding market volume and shop volume, raising further concerns over the potential of violating agreements with non-involved carriers by sharing information with an unrelated third-party.

SCRS researched the issue with PartsTrader and each of the estimating system providers to identify the means and extent in which the data is being accessed and collected; and inquiring if repair facility end-users have options to restrict non-required data from being collected, accessed or shared. As a result of that research, SCRS issued an article outlining the resulting responses from each of the technology organizations. The article concludes that:

  • Technology has increased the ability to communicate information amongst businesses; however, the increase of applications that indiscriminately extract data in the background for unknown or unintended purposes is a concern for repairers who have obligations to protect data generated by their business.
  • There are advancements being made, or already in place, from some estimating system providers which allow collision repair facilities to maintain better control over the data files being exported from the estimating systems to other data collection sources.
  • The solutions and options for each estimating system vary, so it is important to compare capabilities of the software programs relative to features that allow greater control over unwanted data transfer, and to make any necessary profile changes in line with individual business practices.

To read the full article with responses click here.

Do Lower Labor Rates Lead to More Repairs?

Mitchell Industry Trends Report Asks “Do Lower Labor Rates Lead to More Repairs?”

The feature article in this month’s Industry Trends Report from Mitchell International examines the relationship between labor rates and the number of operations on an estimate. The report details Mitchell’s data from the states with the lowest labor rates as well as the highest rates.

Greg Horn, vice president of industry relations, examined first-party collision estimates written in 2013 for all 50 states. The data included estimates written by independent appraisers, body shops and insurance company staff appraisers.

Horn’s analysis comes to three basic conclusions surrounding the issue:

  • Lower rates do not result in more operations on estimates
  • Lower rates do result in more panel repairs
  • Lower rates do not result in additional refinish hours

The complete report is available to read online or can be downloaded as an Adobe Acrobat file.

The Startup Disrupting the Auto Collision Industry

Entrepreneur.com
BY JOE LINDSEY

Estify The Startup Disrupting the Auto Collision Industry

Image credit: Photo © Jeff Clark

Estify’s story reads like a success checklist for tech startups. Young, savvy coders see an industry they can disrupt. Their idea wins university contests and scores an $800,000 seed round of funding. They enter an accelerator. They move to sunny California to make their fortunes.

One twist: the industry. Rather than social media or travel or entertainment or fashion, Estify’s founders set out to modernize an antiquated sector–collision repair. “The industry’s really outdated, and to be honest, that’s why we wanted to work with it,” says Jordan Furniss, who founded Estify in 2012 in Provo, Utah, along with fellow Brigham Young University business student Taylor Moss and Arkansas transplant Derek Carr. “A lot of [shops] are family businesses, and some of the stuff they do is just how they’ve always done it.”

Specifically, the trio wanted to address the mind-numbing process of reconciling the actual cost of repair jobs with the estimates the shops submit to customers’ insurance companies. Comparing estimates to costs–part for part, labor hour for labor hour–is a big time suck, says Danny Panduro, vice president of J&L Body and Paint Shop in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley. “If our system doesn’t match the insurer’s estimate, it messes up accounting ridiculously,” he says. A big repair job can take two hours to reconcile, and J&L does about 20 estimates a week, in line with industry norms.

Estify Reconcile completes this task automatically, comparing two scanned or PDF estimates line-by-line via algorithm and creating a report, so differences can be quickly addressed. “I upload the PDFs, and literally within five minutes I have a reconciliation,” Panduro says. “It’s gold.”

Estify, now based in the greater Los Angeles area, sells its software to repair shops and adjustors for $99 to $500 a month, depending on how robust a system the shop wants and the number of estimates and reconciliations processed.

Within several weeks of its first big public push last October at an industry trade show, Estify had signed up close to 100 shops and was working through a rapidly growing waiting list. “In this industry, if we ended up with a few thousand customers we would be considered a huge success,” Furniss says. “But we’d like to go beyond that and change how it operates.”

The Database Enhancement Gateway Works for You

Want to see the impact collision repair associations like the GCIA have on issues facing our industry?

Look no further than using the DEG as an example. Funded by membership dollars, the DEG gives direct evidence of how associations work to address inaccuracies that can lead to more accurate reimbursement. Here are two recent examples of the types of inquiries the DEG addresses. Think about the fact that these are 2007 vehicles. How many times have these items been performed in the last 6 years?

6141 – 2007 Nissan Altima, Cowl Vent Panel
6168 – 2007 Cadillac Escalade, Liftgate Wiper Arm

If you want to support the DEG, or learn more about it, please visit www.degweb.org. You can also meet the DEG administrator, Art Harris, at the 2013 SEMA Show in booth 11186 in the North Hall.

SCRS Issues Position on Insurer Mandates of Vendors and Processes

The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) has issued a position statement regarding insurer mandates. The position statement is as follows:

In representation of collision repair businesses across the United States, The Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) takes exception to business mandates that property and casualty insurers impose upon collision repair businesses; particularly those that specify required vendors, business platforms or internal processes that must be followed in order to be included in, or avoid being excluded from, certain lines of work. As an example, insurer mandates surrounding parts procurement platforms may inhibit independent collision repair businesses from utilizing parts vendors with whom they have an existing relationship, providing insurers with greater influence and control over the parts supply chain.

SCRS believes this control falls outside of the scope of the insurance business. Some insurers are stipulating agreement to these terms, as a condition of being recognized in Direct Repair Programs (DRP). SCRS supports efforts that rightfully seek to eliminate such intrusion into the collision repair business, and enforcement of existing laws, regulations and codes that currently prohibit such actions. It is the opinion of SCRS that voluntary agreements cannot include stipulations which violate existing laws, rules and regulations. SCRS believes that collision businesses are capable of establishing successful vendor relationships and internal processes that will best accommodate the needs of the consumer, and that service providers will continue to respond to the market with increasingly creative solutions that drive performance for their customers and the respective market entities. We believe that solutions with tangible value propositions will be utilized and supported by the marketplace without the undue influence of insurer mandate.

As an example of the concerns addressed by the position statement, SCRS used the elimination of the “fax-only” option in the PartsTrader electronic ordering system that State Farm’s Select Service repair facility participants are required to use. The elimination of the fax-only option effectively requires suppliers to fully participate in the electronic parts marketplace or lose business from Select Service repair shops.

According to the press release announcing the new position statement, SCRS explained, “The rules of the game are changing and it is apparent that maintaining the relationships and negotiated deals of participating repair facilities is only a priority, so long as all involved submit to do business in the manner prescribed by State Farm Insurance, and other carriers with similar programs. Today these mandates address parts sourcing and ordering, but there is valid concern that they open the door to future market manipulation and influence over other similarly critical collision businesses purchasing habits as well.”

DEG Received 1,300 Inquiries in 2012

DEG Received 1,300 Inquiries in 2012, Up 30%, Expects More than 1,500 in 2013

From Autobody News

In 2012, the Database Enhancement Gateway (DEG) received more than 1,300 inquiries, an increase of approximately 30% from the previous two years, DEG Administrator Arthur Harris reported. This year, DEG expects to receive more than 1,500 inquiries.

The DEG was built to help address individual estimating database issues on specific vehicles. As a free service, those who use estimate systems may submit inquiries to the DEG when they encounter questions or concerns relative to estimating data. The DEG acts as a go-between for shops and information providers—CCC, Mitchell and Audatex—to improve the quality and accuracy of the data used to generate collision repair estimates and to provide feedback to information providers.

Read the full article: DEG Received 1,300 Inquiries in 2012