Auto Collision Repair

SCRS Releases Pulsed Synergic MIG Welding for Aluminum and Collision Repair Video

Prosser, Washington, August 21, 2015 – On Thursday, July 23rd, the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) held an open board meeting in Detroit, Michigan featuring a technical presentation by SCRS Education Committee member Toby Chess focused on important aspects collision repairers should know about Pulsed Synergic MIG Welding for Aluminum. In addition to a detailed look at the science behind the unique welding process, and why more auto manufacturers are relying on it, Chess reported on a comparison of current welders available to the market and how they performed in a 1mm butt weld with a backer field test that was conducted in June 2015. A video recap of the presentation is available here:

Based on the field research, a spreadsheet outlining features from each company can be found here: http://scrs.com/data/uploads/cic-pulse-welder-ss.xlsx.

On Wednesday, November 4th, during the SEMA Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, Toby Chess will be leading a Repairer Driven Education (RDE) session entitled, “Welding Technologies – A Comprehensive Tutorial on Modern Equipment.” One of the most frequent questions posed by collision repair businesses looking to adapt to the changing landscape of automotive repairs is, “what do I need, and where do I start?” The equipment necessary to repair the modern fleet continues to evolve as quickly as the vehicle architecture does, and understanding tool and equipment options that provide the most capability can save repair businesses from unnecessary investments in wrong or outdated repair technology. Anyone looking to expand their understanding of the options available to the industry can register directly for this session by clicking here, or pasting this URL into their browser: https://www.compusystems.com/servlet/ar?evt_uid=242&site=SCRS&opts=RDE14.

For more information about SCRS, or to join as a member, please visit www.scrs.com, call toll free 1-877-841-0660 or email us at info@scrs.com.

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About SCRS: Through its direct members and 45 affiliate associations, SCRS is comprised of 6,000 collision repair businesses and 58,500 specialized professionals who work with consumers and insurance companies to repair collision-damaged vehicles. Additional information about SCRS including other news releases is available at the SCRS website: www.scrs.com. You can e-mail SCRS at the following address: info@scrs.com.

Collision Repair Education Foundation Adopts New Mission

From CollisionWeek News

The Collision Repair Education Foundation announced a new Mission for the national charitable organization: “Supporting collision repair education programs, schools, and students to create qualified, entry-level employees and connect them with an array of career opportunities.”

In addition to seeking monetary and product donations to support high school and college collision school programs, students, and instructors, the Education Foundation will take a more active role in helping ensure that students graduate with the entry-level skill sets the industry is seeking and connect these students with industry employment opportunities.

To bridge the gap between graduating collision students and industry employers, the Education Foundation will be organizing a career fair tour this fall and next spring, which will be available to all industry members to participate. The geographic markets the Education Foundation is targeting for the initial career fair tour include: Atlanta, Denver, Phoenix, Seattle, Orlando, Salt Lake City, Chicago, Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Knoxville, Memphis, and Nashville.

Rick Tuuri, Vice President of Industry Relations at AudaExplore, a Solera Company, and Board of Trustees Chair of the Collision Repair Education Foundation, said, “The collision industry should be proud of the fact that they have provided over $35 million in donations to high school and college collision school programs since 2009 when the Foundation began its philanthropic focus. While those donations have made a significant impact on the instructor’s abilities to provide a quality technical education, to help address the industry’s need of properly trained entry-level collision students, the Board of Trustees has approved this new career focus for the organization.”

Service King Unveils Apprentice Development Program

The Service King Apprentice Development program launches June 30 with expansive rollout planned

CONTACT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Britton Drown
brittond@firehouseagency.com
972-692-0936

RICHARDSON, Texas – June 29, 2015 – Service King Collision Repair Centers, an industry leading multi-state operator of high-quality collision repair services, today unveiled its most innovative recruiting and development effort in the company’s 39-year history with the launch of the Service King Apprentice Development Program.

The revolutionary program offers a highly immersive, fully compensated 52-week training course developed to prepare incoming technicians for careers at Service King. The Apprentice Development Program will officially debut Tuesday, June 30, in Houston with plans to expand to several markets across the country. The rollout plan features launches in Texas, California, Illinois, Georgia and more in 2015.

“This has long been a vision of ours at Service King,” said Chris Abraham, Service King CEO. “We couldn’t be more proud to officially deploy the Apprentice Development Program. Through the leadership and knowledge of our supervisors and location managers, this program will be an invaluable resource for technicians entering the field or looking to rejuvenate their careers. It’s humbling for us as an organization to provide a clear pathway to rewarding careers in the collision repair industry.”

Service King officially welcomed Houston’s inaugural class of apprentice technicians at a kickoff event Monday, June 22.

As part of the program, technicians receive daily on-the-job oversight and training, indulge in a detailed curriculum and progress through a series of competency assessments and succession benchmarks. Technicians are consistently awarded throughout the program and tutored by an assigned Apprentice Supervisor.

“The creation and launch of the Service King Apprentice Development Program was truly a collaborative effort,” said Tyra Bremer, Service King Vice President of Talent Development. “There continues to be a decline in the population of automotive technicians in the U.S., so we made the decision to take that shortage into our own hands. We look forward to welcoming our new Apprentice Technicians and continuing to fuel our Service King learning culture. Grateful appreciation is expressed to the Service King teammates that contributed their valuable time, informative content and insightful ideas as subject matter experts as we designed our learn, earn and succeed program.”

Service King, which recently launched an aggressive veterans hiring initiative, Mission 2 Hire, operates 241 collision repair centers in 21 states across the U.S. For more information and to view a full list of Service King locations, visit www.serviceking.com.

About Service King Collision Repair Centers

Service King is one of the largest multi-location operators of collision repair facilities, dedicated to offering customers an overall superior service experience. Founded in 1976 in Dallas, Texas; Service King is a leader in the collision repair industry, currently serving customers at 241 locations across 21 states. For more information about Service King, visit www.ServiceKing.com. Follow Service King’s news on Facebook, Twitter and the company’s official blog, The Service Advisor.

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Demand, initiatives touted for collision repair jobs

Collision repair might be experiencing a lot of change and uncertainty right now — but at least you can count on that it’s hiring.

A north central Alabama community college has reported demand for collision repair technicians has come from as far as the Florida Panhandle, and two other companies recently announced hiring and training pushes.

“I’ve never had this many jobs available for students. It’s hard to fill all of the requests. Technicians are getting older and retiring and a lot of younger guys aren’t there to fill the holes,” Wallace State Community College Collision Repair head Tim Grace said. “Technology is changing and the way we are doing things is changing. That keeps it from being a dead end street. The need for strong technicians is getting greater and greater. The job field is very broad, and there are good wages to be made out there.”

The college, citing I-CAR, said the annual technician salary in 2013 was $52,000. Wallace State also said some shops were paying — they might have meant charging — $52/hour for body repair/painting, $62/hour for frame repair/measuring and $72/hour for mechanical work.

Read the full article here.

I-CAR Launches Technical Support Portal

From CollisionWeek News

The Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision Repair (I-CAR) has launched its Repairability Technical Support Portal for collision repair technical questions and answers. The site is designed to benefit technicians, shop owners, estimators, insurance specialists and field educators.

“This portal represents I-CAR’s direct solution to the need expressed by the industry; improved accessibility to the repair information required to support performance of complete, safe and quality repairs for the ultimate benefit of the consumer,” said John Van Alstyne, CEO & President of I-CAR. “We have created an online resource that brings the OEM and collision repair worlds together for an exciting collaboration that will make more repair critical information available across the industry, contributing to time, resource and cost savings in all aspects of the repair process.”

Among the portal’s highlights:

  • Thousands of pages of OEM Repair information specific to hundreds of vehicle models
  • “Top 10” repair inquiries, plus an extensive searchable database that allows model specific research into the thousands of technical inquiries I-CAR has already addressed over the years
  • The latest industry news and information
  • Quick and important reference materials such as the Airbag and Partial Replacement Matrices
  • And all the content is accessible on-the-go, from a laptop, tablet, smartphone, etc.

A key element of this new service offering is ‘Ask I-CAR’, a new service I-CAR designed to help the industry with repair technical questions. Inquiries can now be submitted online, or via telephone. ‘Ask I-CAR’ features full-time staff dedicated to responding to collision repair inquiries from users.

State Farm Ordered to Pay Georgia Woman for Breach of Contract and Bad Faith

State Farm Ordered to Pay Georgia Woman for Breach of Contract and Bad Faith

From BodyShop Business

A Georgia state court has ordered State Farm to pay their policyholder $40,508 after a jury found the insurer had breached its contract and acted in bad faith.

The suit stemmed from the insurer’s denials and underpayment of approximately $4,000 in the costs for repairs being performed by Hernandez Collision Center in Savannah, Ga.; the shop was a witness in the case. The judgment included $5,508 for breach of contract, $5,000 as a bad faith penalty and $30,000 in attorney’s fees for a total verdict of $40,508.

“It’s refreshing to see the results in this case and know that a jury of our peers awarded Mrs. Roberts for the hardship caused by her insurer,” said April Hernandez, AAM of Hernandez Collision. “While Hernandez Collision Center gladly works with all insurers, our responsibility is to our customers to ensure all damages to their vehicle are repaired properly and thoroughly. We feel it is also our professional responsibility and moral obligation to help customers like Mrs. Roberts when they’re treated unfairly. We congratulate Mrs. Roberts on her courage and conviction and are thankful that we could help her in this endeavor.”

Online Attendee Registration Opens for NACE and CARS

Both online attendee registration and housing reservations are now open for NACE and CARS 2014, part of Industry Week starting July 27 in Detroit. These include many board and association meetings Monday, July 28; the CIC summer meeting on Tuesday, July 29; the I-CAR Conference and Gala 35th Anniversary Networking Event on Wednesday, July 30; and features the NACE | CARS 2014 Conference + Expo, Wednesday – Saturday, July 30 – August 2 The Expo will be held Thursday and Friday at the COBO Convention Center.

NACE CARS

Expo Passes to access the show floor only can be purchased for $35/each; individual, 90-minute conference sessions are available for $75/session or individual 3 or 4 hour conference sessions are available for $150/session; a Day Pass is $250, and Saturday Mechanical Sessions are $150; a full-access Super Pass is $315 for members and $365 for non-members. All prices noted reflect Early Bird pricing, which is in effect through June 14th. Add-On Education from I-CAR, as well as the CRES/MSO Collision Repair Executive Symposium and TTF Technology & Telematics Forum events are available at an additional charge.

New this year, all registration options include the NACE and CARS Show Floor Receptions on Thursday and Friday evening, the Opening General Session Thursday morning and The Assembly – Industry Forum on Wednesday afternoon. Additional details on these events will be released in the near future.

“As the automotive collision and mechanical industry’s premier networking and training event, we are so pleased to include the Show Floor Receptions, Opening General Session and The Assembly – Industry Forum in every registration this year, as it reflects our desire to create an event that fosters networking and community interaction among our attendees,” stated Dan Risley, Automotive Service Association President.

SCRS Examines Repairer Ability to Control Data Flow

Article details ways repairers may be able to manage how “data pumps” access file information

Many repairers are unaware of the breadth of data being extracted from their servers, where it is being extracted from, what settings they could employ to better control the flow of information, or even how that information may be used beyond its intended purpose. For years, the Society of Collision Repair Specialists (SCRS) has alerted its members about the potential risk and liability associated with inadequate control over estimate data and business information.

As one recent example, SCRS was notified of growing concerns relative to the collection of data through participation in the PartsTrader parts procurement program. As the program rolled out across the nation, more questions began to arise when end-users noticed key identifying information from non-State Farm estimate files populating their PartsTrader dashboard. The repairer concern surrounds the amount of non-voluntary information being provided through the data collection process which could offer valuable information surrounding market volume and shop volume, raising further concerns over the potential of violating agreements with non-involved carriers by sharing information with an unrelated third-party.

SCRS researched the issue with PartsTrader and each of the estimating system providers to identify the means and extent in which the data is being accessed and collected; and inquiring if repair facility end-users have options to restrict non-required data from being collected, accessed or shared. As a result of that research, SCRS issued an article outlining the resulting responses from each of the technology organizations. The article concludes that:

  • Technology has increased the ability to communicate information amongst businesses; however, the increase of applications that indiscriminately extract data in the background for unknown or unintended purposes is a concern for repairers who have obligations to protect data generated by their business.
  • There are advancements being made, or already in place, from some estimating system providers which allow collision repair facilities to maintain better control over the data files being exported from the estimating systems to other data collection sources.
  • The solutions and options for each estimating system vary, so it is important to compare capabilities of the software programs relative to features that allow greater control over unwanted data transfer, and to make any necessary profile changes in line with individual business practices.

To read the full article with responses click here.

I-CAR Introduces Updated Full Frame Partial Replacement Course

From CollisionWeek

I-CAR has added a new Live, instructor-led course to its catalog, Full-Frame Partial Replacement (FFR01). This course provides information on OEM repair procedures and welding requirements for full-frame vehicles.

The three credit hour course meets training requirements for Steel Structural Technicians, Auto Physical Damage Appraisers and Estimators in I-CAR’s Professional Development Program. FFR01 replaces I-CAR’s Steel Full-Frame Sectioning (SPS03) and Steel Full-Frame Technologies and Repair (SPS08) courses, resulting in the need for three less credit hours of training for certain repair professionals. Anyone who has previously taken either SPS03 or SPS08 will not lose training credit that has been earned.

“Properly repairing today’s full-frame vehicles requires a command of an array of considerations. The content in this course can be applied on the job immediately following completion, resulting in increased savings for the shop and the vehicle owner alike,” explained Josh McFarlin, I-CAR Director of Curriculum & Product Development.

Technicians will learn how to identify full-frame designs, partial replacement options and repair considerations for full-frame attachments during the course. They will also have access to HD-quality videos on full-frame partial replacement procedures for some of today’s most popular full-frame vehicles, including Ford F-150, General Motors 1500 frames, RAM 1500 and Jeep Wrangler.

Large Ford stores say cost of aluminum body shop will surpass $70,000

By Bradford Wernle, Automotive News

Michigan Ford dealer Ed Joliffe has been calculating the cost of getting his body shop ready for the 2015 aluminum F-150 pickup, and finds the numbers sobering.

“It’s going to cost anywhere from $50,000 to $100,000. That’s a hell of a chunk,” says Joliffe, who owns Gorno Ford in suburban Detroit.

“I don’t think it’s for the faint of heart. All the small shops won’t be able to touch it.”

He figures it could take five to seven years to recoup that investment, which he deems essential to stay in the body shop business.

Ford is targeting dealers with large body shops as it attempts to organize the F-150 aluminum body repair system. For those dealers, the investment will exceed the $30,000 to $50,000 Ford has cited for a single repair bay. Like Joliffe, many dealers say the cost could be $70,000 or more.

Ford’s effort is creating the Ford National Body Shop Network of dealers and independent shops capable — Ford shies away from the term “certified” — of large structural repairs. The network, whose members have the proper tools and training, will be Ford’s conduit for insurance company repair referrals.

Ford wants to assure customers and insurance companies that collision repair rates will be competitive with rates on the current steel-bodied truck. Those dealers and independent repair shops who invest in equipment and training can hang a Ford National Body Shop Network sign in their showrooms and will be listed on a body shop locator on ford.com.

By year end, Ford wants a network of about 1,500 aluminum-capable body shops, including its 460 dealerships and more than 1,000 independent shops.

Read the full story – click here.